Portraits of Words

Unbelievable works of handwritten text — Artist Phil Vance creates incredible typography portraits reproduced entirely in handwriting. Lover of prints, texture and color, the artist describes his process as “cross hatching but with words”. From Einstein to Mark Twain, each portrait of the series In Their Own Words pays homage to Vance’s favorite historical and artistic figures.

Portraits of Words

To form the outlines, shadows and details of each picture of the word, Vance writes inspirational quotes from each character thousands of times in different sizes and layers. Vance told My Modern Met in an e-mail, “I began to imagine portraits where you could look through the skin of the characters to see inside them and read their thoughts.”

Vance recently started exploring the possibilities of using colors. In one of his most recent portraits – from The Joker, Batman – Vance spent more than 100 hours painting quotations from The Dark Knight. Similar to a pointillist painting, by far the handwritten typography mixes to create the image. Up close, the viewer can notice countless words and phrases in different tones.

Here are just a few of his works:

The In Their Own Words series by Phil Vance features incredible typography portraits made entirely of handwriting.

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Up close, the viewer can notice countless words and phrases in different tones.

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Audrey Hepburn

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Johnny Cash

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Pablo Picasso

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Mark Twain

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Einstein

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Charlie Chaplin

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Edward Abbey

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Bob Dylan

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Nikola Tesla

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Willem de Kooning

Impressive how art can take many forms and reveal a lot about the artist and the object that originated it, right?

Source — MyModernmet

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